Bad Mom, Wonderful Woman: A Tale of One Health Plan

Improved patient experience. As a health care marketing professional, I see the topic everywhere. As a patient, though, it is often nowhere to be found. Here’s my Tale of One Health Plan. One day, one health system, two appointments, two dramatically different patient experiences. In one visit I was a “A Bad Mom,” in the other, “A Wonderful Woman.”

Bad Mom, Wonderful Woman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First the “Bad Mom.” At a Children’s Center” in an affluent hospital, my 15-year old daughter and I entered what looked like beige food court in a mall, little booths for each pediatric specialty ringing the room. Threatening signs dotted the walls cautioning against letting your children bounce on the furniture.

I approached a booth with a simple question. “What time was my appointment?” I had made the appointment for 3 pm but had received a confirmation call for 2:45. Asking one of the Booth Ladies, I was told, “I don’t know when your appointment is for, just sit and wait for the doctor.” This patient experience told me that the hospital’s time was more important than my own and that I could not be trusted to come to an appointment on time.

At 2:43, after eventually learning my appointment was for 3 pm, I decided to dash to the hospital coffee shop on the floor below. When I came back at 2:55, my teenage daughter was nowhere to be seen. Going back to the Booth to ask about my daugther’s whereabouts, the original Booth Lady didn’t even look at me, but told her companion Booth Lady, “I told the mother to wait for the doctor. This patient experience told me I wasn’t a person, but an individual filling a role, and doing it badly at that. Bad Mom, Bad!

Contrast this to my mammography later that day. Not only was I greeted by a friendly woman, I was given thorough instructions reinforced on a patient handout. I was then whisked away into a spa-like changing room, complete with honey colored wood lockers, thick terry robes and ethereal Spa music playing in the background. To top it all off, I got a bracelet commemorating breast health awareness month when I left. I was a “Wonderful Woman.”

Yes, this was the same health system. But no one had bothered to think through how an individual person might experience it’s different parts in her different roles: parent, patient and parental caregiver. I know a unified patient experience is possible.I increasingly use another health system in my area, the Summit Medical Group. The receptionists are uniformly friendly, even when you as the patient screw up. For example, one of the receptionists noticed I missed an appointment in another department and made a call to have them squeeze me in so I wouldn’t have to come back again. That patient experience told me I was an important individual whose time was valuable.

Now the medical care I receive in both systems is excellent. But if I needed a new doctor, I would go to Summit Medical Group. And I am not alone in judging a system by it’s support personnel. According to PwC Health Research Institute, 60% of consumers said staff attitudes are a key factor in evaluating their provider experience. The lesson here is to make sure the patient experience is understood and designed from the patient’s perspective. And that starts from the moment the patient picks up the phone to schedule an appointment.