For Breakthrough Health Care Communication, Try a Visual

 For breakthrough communication, add a visual

How one picture turned the tide against obesity

For most people who read the New York Times article, “Americans are Finally Eating Less”, there was exciting news about the fight against obesity. But for alert pharmaceutical marketers, the article contained the key to changing patient behavior: an effective visual!

While study after study had described the magnitude of the obesity problem, it wasn’t until a researcher put up a set of bright blue maps did people begin to grasp the magnitude of the problem. These maps graphically depicted the dramatic rise in obesity rates in all 50 states from 1991 to 1998.

Power of visual

The article points to the blue map visual as sparking the turning point in the fight against obesity. In the article, Hank Cardello, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, is quoted as saying “People became more aware of it in a very visual and impactful way… That created a lot of attention and concern.”

An underused tool in pharmaceutical communications

In Pharmaceutical marketing, each word directed at the patient is scrutinized endlessly. Visuals or videos are often an afterthought, if they exist at all. While Pharma has embraced the concept of health literacy, its execution has been incomplete, with a narrow focus on grade level.

But visuals are critical to driving health behavior change. For example, in one instance with a low-literacy population at particularly high risk for pneumococcal infection, the group that had viewed a simple visual communication aid was five times more likely to have received the pneumococcal vaccine than those who had not received the visual education tool.

Not just for low literacy populations

But it is not only the low literacy population that gets more out of visualization. Consider Cisco, a world leader in IT, which found that 96% of its customers watch videos for business.  So Cisco started creating videos, over 1,000 new videos a year.

And visualization doesn’t have to be expensive. According to Cisco’s Leslie Drate,“it doesn’t really matter how much we spend on producing the video. The results for what we spend $100,000 on could be similar to what we spend $1,000 on. It just has a lot to do with content and audience.”

                                 Picture Source: Movie CLIP

So to paraphrase the famous phrase from the movie The Graduate, I want to say one word to Pharma marketers responsible for changing patient behavior. Just one word, Visuals!